International Building Code Section 307


International Building Code 306.7

High-hazard Group H-5 structures. Semiconductor
fabrication facilities and comparable research and development
areas in which hazardous production materials (HPM)
are used and the aggregate quantity of materials is in excess of
those listed in Tables 307.1(1) and 307.1(2) shall be classified
as Group H-5. Such facilities and areas shall be designed and
constructed in accordance with Section 415.8.

International Building Code 307.1

High-hazard Group H. High-hazard Group H occupancy
includes, among others, the use of a building or structure, or
a portion thereof, that involves the manufacturing, processing,
generation or storage of materials that constitute a physical or
health hazard in quantities in excess of those allowed in control
areas constructed and located as required in Section 414. Hazardous
uses are classified in Groups H-1, H-2, H-3, H-4 and H-5 and
shall be in accordance with this section, the requirements of Section
415 and the International Fire Code.
Exceptions: The following shall not be classified in Group
H, but shall be classified in the occupancy that they most
nearly resemble:
1. Buildings and structures that contain not more than
the maximum allowable quantities per control area
of hazardous materials as shown in Tables 307.1(1)
and 307.1(2), provided that such buildings are maintained
in accordance with the International Fire
Code.
2. Buildings utilizing control areas in accordance with
Section 414.2 that contain not more than the maximum
allowable quantities per control area of hazardous
materials as shown in Tables 307.1(1) and
307.1(2).
3. Buildings and structures occupied for the application
of flammable finishes, provided that such buildings
or areas conform to the requirements of Section
416 and the International Fire Code.
4. Wholesale and retail sales and storage of flammable
and combustible liquids in mercantile occupancies
conforming to the International Fire Code.
5. Closed piping containing flammable or combustible
liquids or gases utilized for the operation of machinery
or equipment.
6. Cleaning establishments that utilize combustible
liquid solvents having a flash point of 140F (60C)
or higher in closed systems employing equipment
listed by an approved testing agency, provided that
this occupancy is separated from all other areas of
the building by 1-hour fire barriers or 1-hour horizontal
assemblies or both.
7. Cleaning establishments that utilize a liquid solvent
having a flash point at or above 200F (93C).
8. Liquor stores and distributors without bulk storage.
9. Refrigeration systems.
10. The storage or utilization of materials for agricultural
purposes on the premises.
11. Stationary batteries utilized for facility emergency
power, uninterrupted power supply or telecommunication
facilities, provided that the batteries are
provided with safety venting caps and ventilation is
provided in accordance with the International
Mechanical Code.
12. Corrosives shall not include personal or household
products in their original packaging used in retail
display or commonly used building materials.
13 Buildings and structures occupied for aerosol storage
shall be classified as Group S-1, provided that
such buildings conform to the requirements of the
International Fire Code.
14. Display and storage of nonflammable solid and nonflammable
or noncombustible liquid hazardous
materials in quantities not exceeding the maximum
allowable quantity per control area in GroupMor S
occupancies complying with Section 414.2.5.
15. The storage of black powder, smokeless propellant
and small arms primers in Groups M and R-3 and
special industrial explosive devices in Groups B, F,
M and S, provided such storage conforms to the
quantity limits and requirements prescribed in the
International Fire Code.

Hazardous materials. Hazardous materials in any
quantity shall conform to the requirements of this code,
including Section 414, and the International Fire Code.

Definitions. The following words and terms shall,
for the purposes of this section and as used elsewhere in this
code, have the meanings shown herein.
AEROSOL. A product that is dispensed from an aerosol container
by a propellant.
Aerosol products shall be classified by means of the calculation
of their chemical heats of combustion and shall be designated
Level 1, 2 or 3.
Level 1 aerosol products. Those with a total chemical heat
of combustion that is less than or equal to 8,600 British thermal
units per pound (Btu/lb) (20 kJ/g).
Level 2 aerosol products. Those with a total chemical heat
of combustion that is greater than 8,600 Btu/lb (20 kJ/g), but
less than or equal to 13,000 Btu/lb (30 kJ/g).
Level 3 aerosol products. Those with a total chemical heat
combustion that is greater than 13,000 Btu/lb (30 kJ/g).
AEROSOL CONTAINER. A metal can or a glass or plastic
bottle designed to dispense an aerosol. Metal cans shall be limited
to a maximum size of 33.8 fluid ounces (1,000 ml). Glass
or plastic bottles shall be limited to a maximum size of 4 fluid
ounces (118 ml).
BALED COTTON. A natural seed fiber wrapped in and
secured with industry accepted materials, usually consisting of
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USE AND OCCUPANCY CLASSIFICATION
burlap, woven polypropylene, polyethylene or cotton or sheet
polyethylene, and secured with steel, synthetic or wire bands or
wire; also includes linters (lint removed from the cottonseed)
and motes (residual materials from the ginning process).
BALED COTTON, DENSELY PACKED. Cotton made into
banded bales with a packing density of at least 22 pounds per
cubic foot (360 kg/m3), and dimensions complying with the following:
a length of 55 inches (1397 # 20 mm), a width of 21
inches (533.4 # 20mm)and a height of 27.6 to 35.4 inches (701 to
899 mm).
BARRICADE. A structure that consists of a combination of
walls, floor and roof, which is designed to withstand the rapid
release of energy in an explosion and which is fully confined,
partially vented or fully vented; or other effective method of
shielding from explosive materials by a natural or artificial barrier.
Artificial barricade. An artificial mound or revetment a
minimum thickness of 3 feet (914 mm).
Natural barricade. Natural features of the ground, such as
hills, or timber of sufficient density that the surrounding
exposures that require protection cannot be seen from the
magazine or building containing explosives when the trees
are bare of leaves.
BOILING POINT. The temperature at which the vapor pressure
of a liquid equals the atmospheric pressure of 14.7 pounds
per square inch (psi) (101 kPa) gage or 760 mm of mercury.
Where an accurate boiling point is unavailable for the material
in question, or for mixtures which do not have a constant boiling
point, for the purposes of this classification, the 20-percent
evaporated point of a distillation performed in accordance with
ASTM D 86 shall be used as the boiling point of the liquid.
CLOSED SYSTEM. The use of a solid or liquid hazardous
material involving a closed vessel or system that remains
closed during normal operations where vapors emitted by the
product are not liberated outside of the vessel or system and the
product is not exposed to the atmosphere during normal operations;
and all uses of compressed gases. Examples of closed
systems for solids and liquids include product conveyed
through a piping system into a closed vessel, system or piece of
equipment.
COMBUSTIBLE DUST. Finely divided solid material that is
420 microns or less in diameter and which, when dispersed in
air in the proper proportions, could be ignited by a flame, spark
or other source of ignition. Combustible dust will pass through
a U.S. No. 40 standard sieve.
COMBUSTIBLE FIBERS. Readily ignitable and free-burning
materials in a fibrous or shredded form, such as cocoa fiber,
cloth, cotton, excelsior, hay, hemp, henequen, istle, jute, kapok,
oakum, rags, sisal, Spanish moss, straw, tow, wastepaper, certain
synthetic fibers or other like materials. This definition does
not include densely packed baled cotton.
COMBUSTIBLE LIQUID. A liquid having a closed cup
flash point at or above 100F (38C). Combustible liquids shall
be subdivided as follows:
Class II. Liquids having a closed cup flash point at or above
100F (38C) and below 140F (60C).
Class IIIA. Liquids having a closed cup flash point at or
above 140F (60C) and below 200F (93C).
Class IIIB. Liquids having a closed cup flash point at or
above 200F (93C).
The category of combustible liquids does not include compressed
gases or cryogenic fluids.
COMPRESSED GAS. A material, or mixture of materials
which:
1. Is a gas at 68F (20C) or less at 14.7 pounds per square
inch atmosphere (psia) (101 kPa) of pressure; and
2. Has a boiling point of 68F (20C) or less at 14.7 psia
(101 kPa) which is either liquefied, nonliquefied or in
solution, except those gases which have no other healthor
physical-hazard properties are not considered to be
compressed until the pressure in the packaging exceeds
41 psia (282 kPa) at 68F (20C).
The states of a compressed gas are categorized as follows:
1. Nonliquefied compressed gases are gases, other than
those in solution, which are in a packaging under the
charged pressure and are entirely gaseous at a temperature
of 68F (20C).
2. Liquefied compressed gases are gases that, in a packaging
under the charged pressure, are partially liquid at a
temperature of 68F (20C).
3. Compressed gases in solution are nonliquefied gases that
are dissolved in a solvent.
4. Compressed gas mixtures consist of a mixture of two or
more compressed gases contained in a packaging, the
hazard properties of which are represented by the properties
of the mixture as a whole.
CONTROL AREA. Spaces within a building where quantities
of hazardous materials not exceeding the maximum
allowable quantities per control area are stored, dispensed,
used or handled. See also the definition of “Outdoor control
area” in the International Fire Code.
CORROSIVE. A chemical that causes visible destruction of,
or irreversible alterations in, living tissue by chemical action at
the point of contact. A chemical shall be considered corrosive
if, when tested on the intact skin of albino rabbits by the method
described in DOTn 49 CFR, Part 173.137, such a chemical
destroys or changes irreversibly the structure of the tissue at the
point of contact following an exposure period of 4 hours. This
term does not refer to action on inanimate surfaces.
CRYOGENIC FLUID. A liquid having a boiling point lower
than -150F (-101C) at 14.7 pounds per square inch atmosphere
(psia) (an absolute pressure of 101 kPa).
DAY BOX. A portable magazine designed to hold explosive
materials constructed in accordance with the requirements for
a Type 3 magazine as defined and classified in Chapter 33 of
the International Fire Code.
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TABLE 307.1(1)

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TABLE 307.1(2)

International Building Code 307.1.1

Hazardous materials. Hazardous materials in any
quantity shall conform to the requirements of this code,
including Section 414, and the International Fire Code.

International Building Code 307.1.2

Definitions. The following words and terms shall,
for the purposes of this section and as used elsewhere in this
code, have the meanings shown herein.
AEROSOL. A product that is dispensed from an aerosol container
by a propellant.
Aerosol products shall be classified by means of the calculation
of their chemical heats of combustion and shall be designated
Level 1, 2 or 3.
Level 1 aerosol products. Those with a total chemical heat
of combustion that is less than or equal to 8,600 British thermal
units per pound (Btu/lb) (20 kJ/g).
Level 2 aerosol products. Those with a total chemical heat
of combustion that is greater than 8,600 Btu/lb (20 kJ/g), but
less than or equal to 13,000 Btu/lb (30 kJ/g).
Level 3 aerosol products. Those with a total chemical heat
combustion that is greater than 13,000 Btu/lb (30 kJ/g).
AEROSOL CONTAINER. A metal can or a glass or plastic
bottle designed to dispense an aerosol. Metal cans shall be limited
to a maximum size of 33.8 fluid ounces (1,000 ml). Glass
or plastic bottles shall be limited to a maximum size of 4 fluid
ounces (118 ml).
BALED COTTON. A natural seed fiber wrapped in and
secured with industry accepted materials, usually consisting of
2006 INTERNATIONAL BUILDING CODE 25
USE AND OCCUPANCY CLASSIFICATION
burlap, woven polypropylene, polyethylene or cotton or sheet
polyethylene, and secured with steel, synthetic or wire bands or
wire; also includes linters (lint removed from the cottonseed)
and motes (residual materials from the ginning process).
BALED COTTON, DENSELY PACKED. Cotton made into
banded bales with a packing density of at least 22 pounds per
cubic foot (360 kg/m3), and dimensions complying with the following:
a length of 55 inches (1397 # 20 mm), a width of 21
inches (533.4 # 20mm)and a height of 27.6 to 35.4 inches (701 to
899 mm).
BARRICADE. A structure that consists of a combination of
walls, floor and roof, which is designed to withstand the rapid
release of energy in an explosion and which is fully confined,
partially vented or fully vented; or other effective method of
shielding from explosive materials by a natural or artificial barrier.
Artificial barricade. An artificial mound or revetment a
minimum thickness of 3 feet (914 mm).
Natural barricade. Natural features of the ground, such as
hills, or timber of sufficient density that the surrounding
exposures that require protection cannot be seen from the
magazine or building containing explosives when the trees
are bare of leaves.
BOILING POINT. The temperature at which the vapor pressure
of a liquid equals the atmospheric pressure of 14.7 pounds
per square inch (psi) (101 kPa) gage or 760 mm of mercury.
Where an accurate boiling point is unavailable for the material
in question, or for mixtures which do not have a constant boiling
point, for the purposes of this classification, the 20-percent
evaporated point of a distillation performed in accordance with
ASTM D 86 shall be used as the boiling point of the liquid.
CLOSED SYSTEM. The use of a solid or liquid hazardous
material involving a closed vessel or system that remains
closed during normal operations where vapors emitted by the
product are not liberated outside of the vessel or system and the
product is not exposed to the atmosphere during normal operations;
and all uses of compressed gases. Examples of closed
systems for solids and liquids include product conveyed
through a piping system into a closed vessel, system or piece of
equipment.
COMBUSTIBLE DUST. Finely divided solid material that is
420 microns or less in diameter and which, when dispersed in
air in the proper proportions, could be ignited by a flame, spark
or other source of ignition. Combustible dust will pass through
a U.S. No. 40 standard sieve.
COMBUSTIBLE FIBERS. Readily ignitable and free-burning
materials in a fibrous or shredded form, such as cocoa fiber,
cloth, cotton, excelsior, hay, hemp, henequen, istle, jute, kapok,
oakum, rags, sisal, Spanish moss, straw, tow, wastepaper, certain
synthetic fibers or other like materials. This definition does
not include densely packed baled cotton.
COMBUSTIBLE LIQUID. A liquid having a closed cup
flash point at or above 100F (38C). Combustible liquids shall
be subdivided as follows:
Class II. Liquids having a closed cup flash point at or above
100F (38C) and below 140F (60C).
Class IIIA. Liquids having a closed cup flash point at or
above 140F (60C) and below 200F (93C).
Class IIIB. Liquids having a closed cup flash point at or
above 200F (93C).
The category of combustible liquids does not include compressed
gases or cryogenic fluids.
COMPRESSED GAS. A material, or mixture of materials
which:
1. Is a gas at 68F (20C) or less at 14.7 pounds per square
inch atmosphere (psia) (101 kPa) of pressure; and
2. Has a boiling point of 68F (20C) or less at 14.7 psia
(101 kPa) which is either liquefied, nonliquefied or in
solution, except those gases which have no other healthor
physical-hazard properties are not considered to be
compressed until the pressure in the packaging exceeds
41 psia (282 kPa) at 68F (20C).
The states of a compressed gas are categorized as follows:
1. Nonliquefied compressed gases are gases, other than
those in solution, which are in a packaging under the
charged pressure and are entirely gaseous at a temperature
of 68F (20C).
2. Liquefied compressed gases are gases that, in a packaging
under the charged pressure, are partially liquid at a
temperature of 68F (20C).
3. Compressed gases in solution are nonliquefied gases that
are dissolved in a solvent.
4. Compressed gas mixtures consist of a mixture of two or
more compressed gases contained in a packaging, the
hazard properties of which are represented by the properties
of the mixture as a whole.
CONTROL AREA. Spaces within a building where quantities
of hazardous materials not exceeding the maximum
allowable quantities per control area are stored, dispensed,
used or handled. See also the definition of “Outdoor control
area” in the International Fire Code.
CORROSIVE. A chemical that causes visible destruction of,
or irreversible alterations in, living tissue by chemical action at
the point of contact. A chemical shall be considered corrosive
if, when tested on the intact skin of albino rabbits by the method
described in DOTn 49 CFR, Part 173.137, such a chemical
destroys or changes irreversibly the structure of the tissue at the
point of contact following an exposure period of 4 hours. This
term does not refer to action on inanimate surfaces.
CRYOGENIC FLUID. A liquid having a boiling point lower
than -150F (-101C) at 14.7 pounds per square inch atmosphere
(psia) (an absolute pressure of 101 kPa).
DAY BOX. A portable magazine designed to hold explosive
materials constructed in accordance with the requirements for
a Type 3 magazine as defined and classified in Chapter 33 of
the International Fire Code.
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TABLE 307.1(1)

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TABLE 307.1(2)

International Building Code 307.3

High-hazard Group H-1. Buildings and structures
containing materials that pose a detonation hazard shall be
classified as Group H-1. Such materials shall include, but not
be limited to, the following:
Explosives:
Division 1.1
Division 1.2
Division 1.3
Exception: Materials that are used and maintained in
a form where either confinement or configuration will
not elevate the hazard from a mass fire to mass explosion
hazard shall be allowed in H-2 occupancies.
Division 1.4
Exception: Articles, including articles packaged for
shipment, that are not regulated as an explosive under
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms regulations,
or unpackaged articles used in process operations
that do not propagate a detonation or
deflagration between articles shall be allowed in H-3
occupancies.
Division 1.5
Division 1.6
Organic peroxides, unclassified detonable
Oxidizers, Class 4
Unstable (reactive) materials, Class 3 detonable and Class 4
Detonable pyrophoric materials

International Building Code 307.4

High-hazard Group H-2. Buildings and structures
containing materials that pose a deflagration hazard or a hazard
from accelerated burning shall be classified as Group H-2.
Such materials shall include, but not be limited to, the following:
Class I, II or IIIA flammable or combustible liquids which
are used or stored in normally open containers or systems,
or in closed containers or systems pressurized at more than
15 psi (103.4 kPa) gage.
Combustible dusts
Cryogenic fluids, flammable
Flammable gases
Organic peroxides, Class I
Oxidizers,Class 3, that are used or stored in normally open
containers or systems, or in closed containers or systems
pressurized at more than 15 psi (103 kPa) gage
Pyrophoric liquids, solids and gases, nondetonable
Unstable (reactive) materials, Class 3, nondetonable
Water-reactive materials, Class 3

International Building Code 307.5

High-hazard Group H-3. Buildings and structures
containing materials that readily support combustion or that
pose a physical hazard shall be classified as Group H-3. Such
materials shall include, but not be limited to, the following:
Class I, II or IIIA flammable or combustible liquids that
are used or stored in normally closed containers or
systems pressurized at 15 pounds per square inch gauge
(103.4 kPa) or less
Combustible fibers, other than densely packed baled cotton
Consumer fireworks, 1.4G (Class C, Common)
Cryogenic fluids, oxidizing
Flammable solids
Organic peroxides, Class II and III
Oxidizers, Class 2
Oxidizers, Class 3, that are used or stored in normally
closed containers or systems pressurized at 15 pounds per
square inch gauge (103 kPa) or less
Oxidizing gases
Unstable (reactive) materials, Class 2
Water-reactive materials, Class 2
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International Building Code 307.6

High-hazard Group H-4. Buildings and structures
which contain materials that are health hazards shall be classified
as Group H-4. Such materials shall include, but not be limited
to, the following:
Corrosives
Highly toxic materials
Toxic materials

International Building Code 307.8

Multiple hazards. Buildings and structures containing
a material or materials representing hazards that are classified in
one or more of Groups H-1, H-2, H-3 and H-4 shall conform to the
code requirements for each of the occupancies so classified.